How Transitions are Kind of Like Getting Lost on a Hike

The process of transitions seemed to mirror my experience of hiking on the unfamiliar mountain trails that I went on these past few weeks while housesitting for some friends in Denver. We are all in the midst of Dead Ends, Forks in the Road, Feeling Lost but continuing just the same, and arriving at breathtaking vistas, only to continue on the adventure.

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Why am I Writing This Blog?

I don’t claim to have all the answers, nor do I want some enviable online presence that portrays a myth that I’ve got it all figured out. In my present state, I can’t claim any expertise, but I can say that I’m trying to live the questions. In this blog, I’m hoping to voice those vulnerable questions aloud. I think my ikigai right now is creating things that bring those connective and so needed for the human soul moments of “Her too? Oh, I thought I was the only one!”

How to be Messy Well

The truth is, I’m walking contradiction these days. So many complex emotions are swimming around. I feel like I’m a pinprick away from a much needed ugly cry, and I’m also resting in a contented excitement over my upcoming adventure. I am delighting in this season, and also glad to be rid of it. If I start to zoom out too far, I get dizzy at the prospect of so many unknowns, but if I take just the next step, I’m fine. More than fine. Exactly where I’m supposed to be. I’m writing to you from the midst of all of this. And this post reflects the messiness I find myself in. Someone who doesn’t have all the answers, but I’m willing to step into the questions.

The Importance of Ending Well

I think we have a tendency, in our fast paced culture, to avoid endings. We rush into the next thing headlong, not leaving margin to process what just happened. Or we see an ending coming up and we start to withdraw, subtly and efficiently self protecting to avoid the pain of goodbye. We put such emphasis on beginning well, making good first impressions. We labor to invest in things in the midst of things even, but how often do we focus on intentionally ending well?